Linux* Developer Center

   

Cost

  • This community-supported open-source software is free. You have the option of building your own Linux system by starting with a license-free Linux OS kernel. Available frameworks and applications are offered within the embedded Linux community to create the complete system solution.

Performance

  • Embedded Linux offers better real-time performance over standard Linux because it is customized to work on an embedded platform and is optimized for power.

Size

  • The embedded Linux kernel is simpler and smaller than that of the standard Linux OS.

Support

  • Numerous companies contribute to the open-source embedded Linux with continuous kernel compatibility updates and advanced tools.
  • Embedded Linux support sites, such as RocketBoards.org, provide new and advanced users with getting-started guides, design examples, and community forums.
  • Developers that need a commercial embedded Linux solution can use available Linux distributions from WindRiver, MonteVista, and Timesys.
  • Developers can find numerous device-specific drivers, such as USB and Ethernet.

Customization

  • Developers can customize the Angstrom Distribution to their specific application. The latest Linux kernels are always available for download at kernel.org.

Ease of Use

  • Linux OS drivers offer a high-level device abstraction with minimal effort. You can build Linux drivers to provide user space access into custom user peripherals in the FPGA fabric.

Safety

  • Embedded Linux offers a highly stable and tested kernel to use with safety-critical applications. 
  • Open-source safety groups provide presentations, literature, and safety certification for embedded Linux applications.

Portability

  • Many custom-purpose microprocessors have embedded Linux kernel support.

Innovation

  • Collaborative development supports rapid Linux evolution.
  • Linux communities provide a faster medium for incubation and the testing of new capabilities.
  • Absence of contractual constraints allows developers to create new uses, markets, and platforms for the Linux OS.

Stage

Description

Boot ROM

Brings the processor out of reset, performs minimal configuration, and loads the U-Boot into the on-chip RAM

U-Boot

Configures the I/Os, FPGA, phase-locked loops (PLLs) and clocks; initializes DDRAM and loads the Linux kernel

Linux

Manages processes, memories, network stack, and device drivers and runs the end application

SoC EDS Section

Description

Introduction

Provides a general overview of features and the hardware-software development flow

Installation

Outlines how to install the SoC FPGA EDS and the included ARM* Development Studio 5* (DS-5*)

Licensing

Provides licensing options for the SoC FPGA EDS and how to install the license

Embedded Command Shell

Describes how to start the shell that accesses the rest of the SoC FPGA EDS tools

alt-boot-disk-util

Describes the utility that updates the preloader and boot loader on a physical SD card

bsp-editor

Details the graphical user interface (GUI) that allows you to generate the board support package (BSP): boot loader and Linux device tree

Linux compilers

Summarizes the compilers included with the SoC EDS

Repository

Description

linux-socfpga.git/

SoC FPGA Linux development repository

  • Mirrors kernel.org Linux repository releases
  • Downstream branches for SoC FPGA specific

patches and updates

meta-Intel fpga .git/

Repository for SoC FPGA Yocto recipes

  • Starting point for custom Yocto recipes

angstrom-socfpga.git/

Setup scripts for SoC FPGA Angstrom
distribution

uboot-socfpga.git/

SoC FPGA U-Boot development repository

sopc2dts.git/

Device Tree Generator (sopc2dts) repository

linux-refdesigns.git/

Software source code for Linux reference designs

Resource

SoC Device

GSRD Version

Creating and Updating the SD Card

Intel Arria 10

17.0

Flash programming: QSPI, NAND, and SDMMC

Intel Arria 10

16.1

Programming FPGAs

Cyclone® V / Arria V

17.0

Generating the U-Boot Script

Cyclone V

 

Generating and Compiling the Preloader

Cyclone V / Arria V

All

Generating U-Boot and the Device Tree

Intel Arria 10

17.0

Preloader and U-Boot Customization

Cyclone V / Arria V

13.1

Building initramfs Kernels (Simple Root Filesystem)

Intel Arria 10 /
Cyclone V / Arria V

All

Device Tree Generator (Linux)

Intel Arria 10

17.0

Understanding the Linux Device Tree

Intel Arria 10 /
Cyclone V / Arria V

All

Compiling Linux (Building the Kernel and RFS Using Angstrom or from GIT)

Intel Arria 10 /
Cyclone V / Arria V

All

Yocto User Manual

Arria V

14.0

Angstrom Root Filesystem HowTo

Intel Arria 10 /
Cyclone V / Arria V

All

Building Yocto RFS with meta-Intel FPGA

Intel Arria 10 /
Cyclone V / Arria V

All

Resource

SoC Device

GSRD version

Datamover Design Example

Cyclone® V

14.0

Partial Reconfiguration

Intel® Arria® 10

16.1

PCIe* Root Port with MSI

Intel Arria 10 / Cyclone V / Arria V

17.0

SGMII Design Example

Cyclone V

14.0