Programming Support Center

The Programming Center provides an explanation of the programming solutions for the Intel® FPGA programmable MAX® II, MAX® 3000A, MAX® 7000 and Configuration Devices.

MAX® 3000

Intel FPGA MAX 3000A devices can be programmed in-system via the industry standard 4-pin IEEE Standard 1149.1 (JTAG) interface. In-system programmability (ISP) offers quick, efficient iterations during design development and also offers a low-cost production programming solution.

MAX 3000A Device Programming Methods

Intel FPGA Programming Tools

MAX 3000A devices can be programmed with Intel FPGA programming tools (including USB-BlasterTM, ByteBlasterTM II, ByteBlasterMVTM, and MasterBlasterTM download cables, and the Intel FPGA Programming Unit (APU) with the associated adapters) that are used with Intel Quartus® Prime® or Quartus® II software.

In-Circuit Tester

MAX 3000A devices can be programmed using in-circuit testers.

Boundary-Scan Tools

MAX 3000A devices can be programmed using boundary-scan tools.

Third-Party Programmers

Third-party vendors offer support for programming MAX 3000A devices.

IEEE 1532 Programming

MAX 3000A devices support ISP using the IEEE 1532 standard.

Jam STAPL

MAX 3000A device programming can be done with the Jam Standard Test and Programming Language (STAPL) programmer.

MAX® II

MAX® II Devices Programming Methods

Intel® FPGA MAX II devices can be programmed in-system via the industry standard 4-pin IEEE Standard 1149.1 (JTAG) interface. In-system programmability (ISP) offers quick, efficient iterations during design development and also offers a low-cost production programming solution.

Intel® FPGA Programming Tools

MAX II devices can be programmed with Intel® FPGA download cables such as USB-BlasterTM, ByteBlasterTM II, ByteBlasterMVTM, or the MasterBlasterTM with the Quartus® Prime or Quartus II II software.

In-Circuit Tester

MAX II devices can be programmed using in-circuit testers.

Boundary-Scan Tools

MAX II devices can be programmed using boundary-scan tools.

Third-Party Programmers

Third-party vendors offer conventional off board programming support for MAX II devices.

IEEE 1532 Programming

MAX II devices support ISP using the IEEE 1532 standard.

JamTM STAPL

MAX II device programming can be done with the Jam Standard Test and Programming Language (STAPL) programmer.

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Frequently Asked Questions

MAX® 7000

Intel® FPGA MAX® 7000, MAX 7000S, MAX 7000A, and MAX 7000B devices have different programming methods, as shown below.

Programming Methods for MAX 7000 Devices

MAX 7000 devices do not support the JTAG interface and can only be programmed using the conventional method.

Intel® FPGA Programming Tools

MAX 7000 devices can be programmed using Altera Programming Units (APU) with the associated adapters.

Third-Party Programmers

Third-party vendors offer conventional off-board programming support for MAX 7000 devices.

Programming Methods for MAX 7000S, MAX 7000A, and MAX 7000B Devices

The MAX 7000S, MAX 7000A, and MAX 7000B devices can be programmed in-system via the industry standard 4-pin IEEE Standard 1149.1 (JTAG) interface.

Intel® FPGA Programming Tools

MAX 7000S, MAX 7000A, and MAX 7000B devices can be programmed with Intel® FPGA programming tools (including USB-BlasterTM, ByteBlasterTM II, ByteBlasterMVTM, and MasterBlasterTM download cables, and the Altera Programming Unit (APU) with the associated adapters) that are used with Quartus® II software.

In-Circuit Tester

MAX 7000S, MAX 7000A, and MAX 7000B devices can be programmed using in-circuit testers.

Boundary-Scan Tools

MAX 7000S, MAX 7000A, and MAX 7000B devices can be programmed using boundary-scan tools.

Third-Party Programmers

Third-party vendors offer conventional off-board programming support for MAX 7000S, MAX 7000A, and MAX 7000B devices.

IEEE 1532 Programming

MAX 7000S, MAX 7000A, and MAX 7000B devices support in-system programmability (ISP) using the IEEE 1532 standard.

Jam STAPL

MAX 7000S, MAX 7000A, and MAX 7000B devices can be programmed using the JamTM Standard Test and Programming Language (STAPL) programmer.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Configuration Device

Intel® FPGA enhanced configuration devices (EPC16, EPC8, and EPC4) and serial configuration devices (EPCS4, EPCS1, EPCS16, and EPCS64) offer a cost-effective configuration solution for all Intel® FPGA. The enhanced and serial configuration devices have different programming methods as described below.

Enhanced Configuration Device Programming Methods

Intel® FPGA enhanced configuration devices (EPC16, EPC8, and EPC4) and serial configuration devices (EPCS4, EPCS1, EPCS16, and EPCS64) offer a cost-effective configuration solution for all Intel® FPGAs. The enhanced and serial configuration devices have different programming methods as described below.

Enhanced configuration (EPC) devices can be programmed in-system via the industry standard 4-pin IEEE Standard 1149.1 (JTAG) interface. The EPC devices can be programmed using the following methods:

Intel® FPGA Programming Tools

EPC devices can be programmed using Quartus Prime or Quartus II software and Intel® FPGA download cables such as USB-BlasterTM, ByteBlasterTM II, ByteBlasterMVTM or the MasterBlasterTM.

In-Circuit Tester

EPC devices can be programmed using in-circuit testers.

Boundary-Scan Tools

EPC devices can be programmed using boundary-scan tools.

Third-Party Programmers

Third-party vendors offer conventional off-board programming support for EPC devices.

IEEE 1532 Programming

EPC devices support in-system programmability (ISP) using the IEEE 1532 standard.

Jam STAPL

EPC device programming can be done with the Jam Standard Test and Programming Language (STAPL) programmer.

Serial Configuration Device Programming Methods

The serial configuration (EPCS) devices do not support the JTAG interface, the conventional method to program these devices is via the active serial (AS) programming interface. The EPCS devices can be programmed using the following methods:

Intel® FPGA Programming Tools

EPCS devices can be programmed using Quartus II software through Intel® FPGA download cables such as USB-Blaster and ByteBlaster II. The older versions of Intel® FPGA download cables (ByteblasterMV and MasterBlaster) cannot be used to program these devices.

In-System Programming Using External Microprocessor

EPCS devices can be programmed in-system by an external microprocessor using SRunner. SRunner is a software driver developed for embedded serial configuration device programming that designers can customize to fit in different embedded systems.

In-System Programming Using Serial Flash Loader

EPCS devices can be programmed via the JTAG interface by using an FPGA as a bridge between the JTAG interface and the EPCS device.

Third-Party Programmers

Third-party vendors offer conventional off board programming support for EPCS devices.

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Frequently Asked Questions