FPGA Security Technical Specifications

Multiple entry points across the Intel® FPGA portfolio for data security give network builders the flexibility to find the right balance of performance, power, and features.

Intel® Agilex™ FPGA Series

F-Series

Flexible range of applications

I-Series

Bandwidth-intensive apps

M-Series

Compute-intensive apps

Up to 58 Gbps transceivers Up to 116 Gbps transceivers Up to 116 Gbps transceivers
PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 5 PCIe Gen 5
DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 SDRAM DDR5 and Intel® Optane™ persistent memory
(Optional) Quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 SoC Quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 SoC Quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 SoC
  Compute Express Link (CXL) to Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors Compute Express Link (CXL) to Intel® Xeon® Scalable processor
    High-Bandwidth Memory

Intel® Stratix® 10 FPGA Series

GX Series

High-throughput systems

SX Series

Embedded performance and power efficiency

TX Series

5G communications, cloud computing, NFV

DX Series

Bandwidth-intensive, custom servers for CSPs

NX Series

Optimized for AI applications

28 Gbps NRZ transceivers 28 Gbps NRZ transceivers 28 Gbps NRZ transceivers or 58 Gbps PAM-4 transceivers 58 Gbps PAM-4 transceivers 58 Gbps PAM-4 transceivers
PCIe Gen 3 PCIe Gen 3 PCIe Gen 3 PCIe Gen 4 PCIe Gen 3
  Quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 Quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 Quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 Quad-core Arm Cortex-A53
      Up to 512 Gbps HBM2 DRAM SIP Up to 512 Gbps HBM2 DRAM SIP
    Dual mode modulation for backwards compatibility Intel® Ultra Path Interconnect (Intel® UPI) for direct connection to Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors AI Tensor Block with up to 143 INT8 TOPS at ~1 TOPS/W

Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are integrated circuits with logic that can be programmed or changed before or after deployment. FPGAs are often used to offload key workloads from other processors, like the CPU, to improve overall system performance. Multiple FPGAs can be deployed in a configuration, allowing for greater parallelization of workloads. In the context of data security, Intel® FPGAs also offer dedicated hardware blocks for data encryption, to help improve the performance and security of network traffic.

FPGAs can help harden a network from malware and other attacks by accelerating data encryption and making it more efficient. There are no specific threats that FPGAs are designed to defend against. However, Intel® FPGAs also offer embedded security and manageability features, like Secure Device Manager, that help prevent the FPGA from being compromised.

Telcos, CSPs, enterprise data centers, and virtually any business with a network can benefit from FPGA data security. FPGAs can be used to help secure data the moment it enters the network perimeter through remote waystations, Ethernet pipelines, VPN endpoints, or other channels. In many cases, it pays to encrypt data at every node in the fabric, and not just at the perimeter, to help defend against internal vectors of attack.