Intel Vision 2022: Day 1 Keynote Live Blog

Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger and a host of Intel leaders discuss the “Evolution of the Digital Renaissance.”

To open the first Intel Vision, the latest hybrid event in the new Intel ON series, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger and a host of Intel leaders discuss the “Evolution of the Digital Renaissance.” They show how Intel — with its customers and partners — sees opportunities to shape education, healthcare, finance, retail and industry. 

Press Kit: Intel Vision 2022

Gelsinger is joined by Intel leaders Keyvan Esfarjani, Michelle Johnston Holthaus, Raja Koduri, Nick McKeown, Sandra Rivera and Christoph Schell, in addition to several invited guests.

Live Blog

Follow along below for real-time updates of this virtual event. 

9:01 a.m.: Hello and welcome! This is Jeremy Schultz, communications manager at Intel, and thank you for tuning in for the first ever Intel Vision keynote. I’m following along live as the show is broadcast from a ballroom at the Gaylord Texan Resort, where the lights are down and we’re watching the ultra-wide screen behind an ultra-wide stage.

On screen, new Intel Chief Commercial Officer Christoph Schell is making his way into the resort and through the venue. He looks like he’s in a hurry.

Christoph Schell, executive vice president and chief commercial officer, Sales, Marketing and Communications Group at Intel Corporation, greets the audience at the opening of Intel Vision 2022 on May 10 in Dallas. During the hybrid event, Intel’s leaders will announce advancements across silicon, software and services, showcasing how Intel brings together technologies and the ecosystem to unlock business value for customers today and in the future. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

9:04 a.m.: Christoph bounds onto the stage: “Let’s get this show started!” That means it’s time for everybody’s favorite chief geek: Christoph welcomes Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger to center stage.

What’s on tap, Pat? “Today you’ll hear from Intel leaders and numerous partners on how we are applying our resources and scale to enable you to capitalize on the power of technology.”

9:06 a.m.: Pat moves fast, talks fast and despite getting mathematically older, seems to be getting faster — at least from this observer’s perspective. “The pace of tech evolution right now is the fastest of your life,” Pat says. “Yet it’s also the slowest for the rest of your life.”

He says he’s been saying that for the past several years, “which proves the point.”

“We are at the precipice of a digital renaissance.” Painted by DALL-E, which certainly does prove the point.

The challenges we face are so complex, entwined and reliant on leading-edge tech that we need new ways to collaborate and partner, Pat asserts.

Pat Gelsinger, Intel CEO, speaks at Intel Vision 2022 on May 10 in Dallas. During the hybrid event, Intel’s leaders announced advancements across silicon, software and services, showcasing how Intel brings together technologies and the ecosystem to unlock business value for customers today and in the future. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

9:07 a.m.: “Technology has been this powerful bridge in this COVID period of time…but what if in an instant it goes dark!”

And just like that, the lights go out. I thought Texas power outages were a winter thing?

9:09 a.m.:  Hold on, low lights are up. Demo time? “Sometimes when disasters strike, we lose access to the tech we’ve become dependent on.” But Pat’s gonna show, “in real time,” a solution with 5G.

“Imagine you’re a first responder, you’re setting up and you have no communication.”

9:10 a.m.: Pegatron, better known for building laptops and smartphones, “developed a portable 5G base station and radio designed for emergency responders.”1

It’s about the size of a carry-on suitcase ­— don’t leave home without it.

And Pat says there’s one running in the auditorium, over which a security camera is streaming video to a phone and a drone mounted overhead broadcasts a Wi-Fi signal for additional connections.

9:11 a.m.: “The 5G network is capable of delivering a gigabit per second of throughput.”

This totable 5G-in-a-box leverages Intel’s full software stack and runs on an Intel Xeon Scalable platform, Pat adds. “Pegatron told me they could not have done this without the partnership of Intel.”

9:13 a.m.: “Challenges abound, but the opportunity is endless! Because at our disposal are what I call the four ‘superpowers.’”

For your Pat bingo card, the superpowers are: ubiquitous compute, cloud to edge infrastructure, pervasive connectivity and AI.

9:14 a.m.: “Each superpower is impressive on its own. But, when they come together, wow, that is magic.”

9:15 a.m.: “Moving fast has always been important to innovation.” Pat pauses for a meditation on speed.

Though “torrid” is dictionarily defined as “scorching,” Pat says his use of the word “takes the need for speed and transforms it into a vector.”

9:16 a.m.: From the bigger picture, we’re at an Andy Groveian “strategic inflection point,” Pat says. “Today, every business is becoming a technology business.”

9:17 a.m.: Businesses are struggling to manage supply chain disruptions, the pandemic and new work arrangements, and geopolitical and economic uncertainty.

“These are challenges we are all facing. And today, the team is excited to take you through some of the ways we are transforming challenges into solvable problems — for today and tomorrow.”

9:18 a.m.: Christoph has returned with Pat, and he vouches for torridity — “certainly the word I would use to describe our energy, passion and commitment to customers.”

“When people hear the name Intel, many think it’s just a hardware chip company — but it’s actually so much more.” Intel designs complete solutions with all sorts of hardware and software, Christoph asserts.

The opportunity to “stitch together an ecosystem of partners, service providers, system integrators, and software designers, just to name a few.”

9:19 a.m.: Which brings us back to the supply chain. “Critical industries…are being transformed by the power of semiconductors,” Christoph says. “All this has led to unprecedented demand for chips.”

That’s why we need more chipmaking capacity “and a more diversified, secure, and geographically balanced supply chain,” says Pat. “We are only getting started.”

In the last quarter alone, Intel announced new manufacturing locations in Ohio and Germany, in addition to further expansions in Europe.

9:19 a.m.: Christoph tosses the virtual mic to the person in charge of those fabs, Keyvan Esfarjani, Intel’s chief global operations officer, who joins the show by video.

9:20 a.m.: Keyvan: “Here at Intel, we are taking both short-term and long-term actions to increase global capacity and improve the global supply chain.”

In the short term, Intel adapts production to fast-moving customer needs. “In Q1 alone we remixed close to 3 million units of CPUs based on shifting customer demand,” Keyvan explains.

Intel also works closely with partners and suppliers to mitigate constraints. For instance: “we have worked with our substrate suppliers to develop more efficient manufacturing processes, basically helping them to help us, which has benefitted Intel directly but also our customers.”

9:21 a.m.: Longer term, there’s the aforementioned expansions plus Intel Foundry Services, where “Intel is opening its fab doors wide to serve the needs of our customers across the globe.”

Keyvan puts his hard hat back on and gets back to pouring concrete.

9:22 a.m.: Christoph sends Pat off for a torrid breather and invites Michelle Johnston-Holthaus, who runs Intel’s Client Computing Group. At Intel, she’s better known as MJ.

Christoph Schell (left), executive vice president and chief commercial officer, Sales, Marketing and Communications Group at Intel Corporation, and Michelle Johnston Holthaus, executive vice president and general manager of the Client Computing Group at Intel Corporation, speak at Intel Vision 2022 on May 10 in Dallas. During the hybrid event, Intel’s leaders announced advancements across silicon, software and services, showcasing how Intel brings together technologies and the ecosystem to unlock business value for customers today and in the future. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

9:22 a.m.: Amid all the change happening in the world, Christoph asks MJ, “what are you seeing?”

MJ: “A key driver of success in organizations around the world is embracing the right technology.”

And it starts with the PC, “the human touchpoint that people rely on to focus, to create, to connect and to help drive businesses forward.”

9:25 a.m.: “Over the course of a weekend, we transitioned tens of thousands employees to remote work, to keep them safe and keep Intel highly operational,” MJ recalls.

And then to meet increasing demand, we had to manage and expand supply chain operations “from our living rooms and kitchen tables.”

9:27 a.m.: One industry most affected by the pandemic, Christoph says, is healthcare. It’s become “much more personal by integrating technology to improve delivery of care.”

MJ: “Healthcare has experienced a gradual digital transformation over the past 20 years, but the advancements resulting from the pandemic have been astounding.”

Telehealth by physicians jumped from 25% to 80%, while remote patient monitoring and healthcare videoconferencing use each doubled.

9:27 a.m.: MJ invites Rob Summers, enterprise solutions architect for Intermountain Healthcare, a team of more than 41,000 caregivers, to center stage to talk about the pandemic in first-line terms.

Michelle Johnston Holthaus (left), executive vice president and general manager of the Client Computing Group at Intel Corporation, speaks with Rob Summers, enterprise solutions architect at Intermountain Healthcare, at Intel Vision 2022 on May 10 in Dallas. During the hybrid event, Intel’s leaders announced advancements across silicon, software and services, showcasing how Intel brings together technologies and the ecosystem to unlock business value for customers today and in the future. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

9:30 a.m.: Rob’s IT challenge: to convert 1,500 remote telehealth systems to a new set up, but do it without having to suit up in full PPE to service computers in hospitals. Using Intel vPro technology, the conversion could be completed remotely.

9:32 a.m.: Intermountain’s vPro transformation was brought-to-you by 12th Gen Intel Core processors, MJ adds, “our most scalable platform of all time.”

9:33 a.m.: But for folks looking for more? “I am excited to announce the launch of 12th Gen Intel Core HX mobile workstation processor.”

This is the final product in the 12th Gen Core processor family, MJ says, “created for professionals who need maximum performance and flexibility to navigate this hybrid environment.”

The specs: up to 16 cores, clock speeds up to 5 GHz and “unrivaled performance.”

Think it might come with a 5G modem option? I’m envisioning a mobile 5G network in one hand and a mobile workstation in the other — the ultimate work-from-anywhere combo.

9:34 a.m.: We’re back with Christoph: “The future of work — and the future of compute — and the impact it’ll have on our lives, the foundation lies in the data center.”

And with that Christoph asks Sandra Rivera, who leads Intel’s Data Center and AI Group, onto the stage.

9:35 a.m.: Christoph: how is the data center helping customers grow their business?

Sandra: “The data center provides the foundational infrastructure on which massive amounts of data can be analyzed for near real-time insights and intelligence.”

The amount of data is heading up and to the right — expected to more than double by 2025, according to researchers at IDC.

“Intel’s role is to provide customers with the technology to help make sense of it all.”

9:35 a.m.: And do so, Christoph points out, as simply as possible.

Sandra: “We do this by providing hardware and software solutions that are easy to deploy and manage — from the cloud to the edge, to the enterprise and the client.”

For instance: StubHub, which made “a seamless transition” from its own servers to Intel-powered systems in the Google Cloud Platform, in the process gained “a 64% performance improvement…while lowering licensing costs.”

9:37 a.m.: What about customers that want customized solutions?

Xeon will “be the compute platform running the broadest range of workloads,” Sandra says, but Intel’s complementing it with additional architectures, like the Infrastructure Processing Unit.

“These IPUs were co-developed with large-scale customers like Google and Microsoft to enable them to customize their infrastructure.”

Sandra says the IPU roadmap through 2026 will be shared later today during the Business Insights session, which you can also watch online.

9:38 a.m.: Solutions, suggests Christoph, pair software and silicon.

Sandra: Nearly every one of our customers benefits from the extensive software optimizations that are tuned to the differentiated features in our hardware.”

Take Salesforce: work to optimize “proxy workloads” resulted in a “53% gen-on-gen throughput gain.” The company was able to accelerate time-to-market by cutting “platforms deployment time from one year to three months,” Sandra says.

Tuned software maximizes CPU utilization, which improves performance-per-watt and “helps them address sustainability goals.” Fast is efficient!

9:40 a.m.: Speaking of data center software, “a lot of our customers are excited about Intel’s recent acquisition of Granulate,” Christoph notes.

That’s because Granulate’s software achieves those Salesforce-like improvements “without requiring any code changes,” says Sandra. “On average, customers can realize up to 60% performance improvement while lowering costs 20-30% after deploying Granulate’s real-time optimization software.” (Note to Intel IT: does it work in employee PCs? Please investigate.)

Nylas, a software-as-a-service company that runs business automation software on AWS and Google Cloud, cut 35% off the cost of their compute spend with Granulate. This is the purest definition of “coupon code” that exists.

Sandra Rivera, executive vice president and general manager of the Datacenter and AI Group at Intel Corporation, displays a wafer holding 4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors (code-named Sapphire Rapids) before the opening of Intel Vision 2022 on May 10 in Dallas. During the hybrid event, Intel’s leaders will announce advancements across silicon, software and services, showcasing how Intel brings together technologies and the ecosystem to unlock business value for customers today and in the future. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

9:41 a.m.: So, if your business isn’t running Granulate, you’re throwing money away?” quips Christoph. Sandra, what else you got?

Sandra’s got a wafer.

“We’re always looking for ways to help customers simplify deployment of the latest technology,” Sandra says. “Xeon is the foundation.”

The newest Xeon is the 4th Gen Xeon Scalable Processor, codenamed Sapphire Rapids. And “we’re shipping initial SKUs today.”

“Every customer wants to get their hands on this,” Sandra adds. Instead of buying a box of accelerators — for AI, cryptography, networking and database transactions — “you can buy Sapphire Rapids, and have all of that in one processor.”

9:42 a.m.: Christoph: what about “the edge?” Will it negate the data center?

Sandra: Data centers and clouds are still key, but they are no longer “the only.” By 2025, Gartner predicts that more than 50% of enterprise-generated data will be outside of central data centers due to latency, security and cost issues.

9:43 a.m.: Sandra suggests bringing Nick McKeown, who leads Intel’s Network and Edge Group (or NEX, a great piece of acronym-engineering) and lives on the edge, into the conversation.

Here’s Nick! “Every week I speak with customers feeling the impact of the rapid growth in edge computing.”

But they need help and have a lot of questions — from how to deploy robotics to responding to trends.

9:44 a.m.: “Edge computing can be complicated,” Nick says, but Intel’s been working for years to understand possibilities and team up with partners to fashion solutions.

“Today we have over 300 market-ready solutions,” counting up to more than 45,000 deployments across 160+ countries in the last four years.

More telling? “Have of those, 20,000, of those deployments took place in just the last year.”

“Let me introduce you to one of those innovative small businesses that is embracing edge computing,” Nick says, “to embrace how you can build a new frictionless, automated retail experience: Nourish + Bloom Market.”

9:45 a.m.: A video shows a light-and-bright walk-in-walk-out grocery store, with employees helping customers and running an all-day bistro inside. The store even offers temperature-controlled robotic deliveries!

What a great name, who doesn’t want to “nourish and bloom?”

Nick McKeown (left), senior vice president and general manager of the Network and Edge Group at Intel Corporation, speaks with Jilea Hemmings (center) and Jamie Hemmings, the founders of Nourish + Bloom, at Intel Vision 2022 on May 10 in Dallas. During the hybrid event, Intel’s leaders announced advancements across silicon, software and services, showcasing how Intel brings together technologies and the ecosystem to unlock business value for customers today and in the future. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

9:46 a.m.: Nick introduces Jilea and Jamie Hemmings, who started the company and earlier this year launched their first store in Fayetteville, Georgia.

9:47 a.m.: Nick asks the Hemmings what role technology plays in the store?

Jamie: Pandemic had a huge impact. After the pandemic, 87% of consumers prefer to shop in stores with touchless or self-checkout options.

Jilea: Intel and UST played a critical role. With computer vision, can monitor everything in the store and provide an amazing customer journey.

9:49 a.m.: Nick: What’s been the customer response?

Jamie: It’s been great. Customers travel an hour or two to see our store.

Jilea: We want to expand across the country, and even into the metaverse. Whoa!

9:50 a.m.: Nick tosses the show back to Christoph: “The future of shopping is bright!”

Considering all this data, how do we secure it and keep confidential info private?

Sandra: “What customers need are easy to deploy security platforms that protect data when it’s being used, when it’s being stored and when it’s being moved.”

9:51 a.m.: Data breaches are getting expensive, Christoph says, averaging $4.2 million per breach according to an IBM Security report.

“The hardware-enhanced security solutions we deliver help protect the entire compute stack,” Sandra says, providing “a trusted choice for secure computing at all layers running on Intel hardware.”

9:52 a.m.: Intel Xeon processors include protections like crypto accelerators and ciphers, Sandra explains. In addition, Intel SGX provides secure enclaves within Xeon that help keep data and sensitive IP inaccessible to unauthorized parties or software.

“SGX is one of the core technologies within Microsoft Azure Confidential Computing.”

Sandra invites Tim Frasier from Bosch Automotive North America to talk about confidential computing and sensitive machine-learning models.

9:54 a.m.: Howdy Tim!

Sandra: It’s important to train autonomous cars to meet safety standards, but what are the barriers to using real data?

Tim: We need a large collection of real-world data to make the systems as safe as possible, but the risk of a leak means a possible heavy fine or reputational damage for Bosch.

9:55 a.m.: So, how is Intel helping you overcome that?

Tim: Thanks to Intel SGX, these safety critical systems can actually get access to the original data sets in an encrypted data set, training algorithms in “a privacy-preserving manner.”

And using Confidential Computing on Azure powered by Intel SGX is a much more economic and flexible way for use to do machine learning.

9:56 a.m.: What’s next for Bosch in this area?

Tim: We’re continuing to push new boundaries and looking at new use cases.

9:58 a.m.: Sandra and Tim head off stage and we’re back with Christoph: “Speaking of zettabytes of data, we are working towards our goal of zettascale computing that Pat talked about last October at our Intel Innovation event.”

So, what is zetta-scale computing? It’s about 1000x what we have today.

It’s zetta time! Christoph calls up Raja Koduri to talk about zettascale and more.

Christoph Schell (left), executive vice president and chief commercial officer, Sales, Marketing and Communications Group at Intel Corporation, speaks with Raja Koduri, executive vice president and general manager of the Accelerated Computing Systems and Graphics Group, at Intel Vision 2022 on May 10 in Dallas. During the hybrid event, Intel’s leaders announced advancements across silicon, software and services, showcasing how Intel brings together technologies and the ecosystem to unlock business value for customers today and in the future. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

10:00 a.m.: But first, video. Christoph says customers want solutions to support lots of real-time media streams but keep costs down. What can we do to help?

Raja: The Xeon platform has been “the gold standard” for video processing for a long time, but “there hasn’t been a media solution that addresses all the quality, density and latency requirements — until now. We designed our data center GPU, Arctic Sound-M, to address this gap.”

Holding the sleek and shiny card in his hand, Raja says this solution does encoding, decoding, rendering and inference in the cloud.

It runs the same software stack as Xeon, Raja says.

And Arctic Sound-M has the industry’s only open-source software stack for streaming media, cloud gaming, and analytics, not to mention the first hardware-based AV1 encoder for the data center.

10:01 a.m.: Raja is rattling off some serious specs for this “media supercomputer on a single chip.”

When can customers have it?

Raja: Next quarter.

10:02 a.m.: Christoph asks, What’s the metaverse?

Raja: “Imagine a virtual world with distance and geographical boundaries erased.” Where “proper 3-D interactions are possible” and the online audience feels like they’re in the same room.

“The compute needed for that real-time, photo-realistic effect, with full sensory immersion, is the future.”

10:03 a.m.: Christoph: “You’re saying the metaverse requires a lot of compute?”

The metaverse has many definitions, but for Raja “it’s a photo-realistic and immersive virtual environment that connection billions globally to work, play, collaborate and socialize in new ways.”

This requires zetta-scale computing, Raja adds. We’ve gone meta-zetta!

10:04 a.m.: So, we’re talking about advancing Intel’s hardware and silicon roadmaps, Christoph suggests.

Yes, and “we also need a software infrastructure layer and an intelligence layer that leverages new AI,” Raja explains.

Something like Project Endgame, which Raja defines as “a unified service layer that senses and taps into computing resources from anywhere — the cloud, edge, your home — to provide an always-available, low latency, continual service.”

The vision is basically infinite turbo.

10:05 a.m.: Raja suggests a demo.

Raja has a laptop that’s running the Matrix Awakens City Sample demo by Epic Games.

The scene looks rather…“not great,” Raja assesses.

This laptop was not designed to handle GPU-hungry rendering workloads, Raja says.

What about the big workstation on the other side of the stage?

So glad you asked. With the Project Endgame infrastructure, this laptop can tap into the additional computing muscle of that workstation. All it takes is a one-button activation.

Christoph Schell (left), executive vice president and chief commercial officer, Sales, Marketing and Communications Group at Intel Corporation, speaks with Raja Koduri, executive vice president and general manager of the Accelerated Computing Systems and Graphics Group, at Intel Vision 2022 on May 10 in Dallas. During the hybrid event, Intel’s leaders announced advancements across silicon, software and services, showcasing how Intel brings together technologies and the ecosystem to unlock business value for customers today and in the future. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

10:07 a.m.: Let’s try it with Endgame. “Much better,” Raja says. “I can see so much more detail and fidelity; the scene is moving smoother now.”

It’s that easy. No special accounts or settings required.

Christoph: When can I have it?

Raja: “The technology is in development. We’ll start beta testing in the back half of this year.”

10:10 a.m.: OK, so we’ve got the metaverse inching toward us on the conveyor belt, “what other mega problems and challenges are working to help solve with compute?” asks Christoph.

Raja: “Some of the most complex challenges that humans are facing are solved by the scientific simulation of the world — from sub-micron levels to the entire galaxy.” Cue the dreamy mind-blown GIF!

Raja invites Rick Stevens, associate laboratory director at Argonne National Laboratory, to talk about tackling said mega-problems with the Aurora supercomputer.

10:11 a.m.: So, what do we do with 2 exaFLOPS of compute?

Rick: Aurora makes it possible to do more accurate climate predictions, improve manufacturing, discover new cancer treatments or prototype the metaverse.

Raja: Where’s Aurora today?

Rick: We’re starting to build it. Each Aurora blade will have two Sapphire Rapids CPUs connected to six Ponte Vecchio GPUs.

It’s taking shape in a massive 10,000-square-foot area where the team is busy installing racks, the storage system and cooling infrastructure.

Rick Stevens, laboratory director for Computing, Environment and Life Sciences at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks at Intel Vision 2022 on May 10 in Dallas. During the hybrid event, Intel’s leaders announced advancements across silicon, software and services, showcasing how Intel brings together technologies and the ecosystem to unlock business value for customers today and in the future. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

10:14 a.m.: Raja: What are the challenges with bringing up an exascale system like Aurora?

Rick: “Programming for brand new architectures is always a challenge for the scientific computing community.” But thanks to oneAPI, applications can run across the CPU and GPU without changing code. “It just works.”

Raja: We should be making a lot of computing available to a lot of people — “our vision is ‘Exascale for everyone.’”

Rick: “I’m pleased to announce that Aurora will be available for academic and commercial usage — we’re taking reservations for development accounts now.”

Raja: “So I can get a 2-exaFLOP account!”

10:16 a.m.: As Raja and Rick head off stage to tackle some astrophysical AI, Christoph returns with Sandra and Nick.

Christoph: AI is becoming a requirement for virtually every business — is it the most important technology for customers to understand and adopt?

Sandra: Customers are using AI to solve a variety of complex problems: genomics research, soil analysis in farming, blocking barking dogs on conference calls.

Deploying AI “can seem daunting,” but Intel’s working to make it more accessible and attainable. For example, Intel partnered with Accenture on Project Apollo, “a program that will provide enterprises with over 30 open-source AI reference kits.” They’ll be released in July.

10:18 a.m.: Nick: “At the edge, AI inference is transforming everything.”

Intel works with customers to design and deploy AI strategies, often with the help of OpenVINO, “our high-performance AI inferencing software toolkit.” With OpenVINO, developers can “write their model once to the API and it automatically optimizes for whatever Intel AI hardware you’re running.”

“You can mix and match solutions for the highest ROI.”

Sandra: Customers have a range of needs and Intel offers a single, open software programming environment across a range of architectures.

“Today, most of the AI dataflow runs on Xeon. With Xeon, customers get the AI they need on the CPU they have.”

10:20 a.m.: One great example is John Deere.

Nick says the 180-year-old company “uses Intel’s AI technology to solve a costly, age-old problem — finding welding defects in the manufacturing process.”

Rather than have a skilled technician just look at welds flying by, Intel and Deere built a system beyond the human sense’s capability.

Sandra: And my favorite part: this AI defect detection solution is powered by Intel Core, Movidius and OpenVINO.

10:21 a.m.: And the edge isn’t just changing how tractors are built, but also how they’re run, Nick says. Oooh, robot tractors?

Nick invites Ben Alfi, CEO of Blue White Robotics, and Chris Swan from Federated Wireless, to talk fully autonomous tractors in farming — robot farmers!

Nick: Ben, what was the vision behind your company?

Ben: The vision is precision agriculture, to use autonomy to improve efficiency, yields, productivity and as a result, profitability to farmers.

10:23 a.m.: Nick: Why is real-time decision making important?

Ben: Farms might look quiet but at any given moment there is a tremendous amount going on in the fields. Data gives new visibility that allows farmers to make better decisions, like spraying herbicides or pesticides only where they’re needed.

Nick: Chris, this vineyard is remote — how do you ensure fast and reliable connections?

Chris: Deploying a private 5G network across the farm enables that real-time connection with the bandwidth and reach that’s required.

Nick follows Ben and Iyad to go make some autonomous wine — we’re back with Christoph and Sandra.

10:27 a.m.: Christoph: We’ve covered a range of architectures for AI, notably Xeon CPUs and different GPUs. Where do discrete AI accelerators like Gaudi fit?

Sandra: Gaudi processors are used for the highest end deep learning training.

Gaudi trains large and complex AI models “much more efficiently,” providing up to 40% better price/performance versus competitive GPU-based solutions in the AWS cloud. But there’s more to come.

“I’m delighted to announce availability of our 7nm Gaudi2, launching today, that delivers a major leap in deep learning performance.”

And we’re gonna get a look. Sandra holds up a Gaudi 2 card and invites Eitan Medina to demonstrate it in action.

Sandra Rivera, executive vice president and general manager of the Datacenter and AI Group at Intel Corporation, displays a Habana Gaudi2 Mezzanine card at Intel Vision 2022 on May 10 in Dallas. During the hybrid event, Intel’s leaders will announce advancements across silicon, software and services, showcasing how Intel brings together technologies and the ecosystem to unlock business value for customers today and in the future. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

10:29 a.m.: Eitan kicks off a training run for a computer vision model on a single Gaudi 2. “Customers wish to train more and pay less, so they care about two things: the cost of using the server and the time it takes to train their models.”

10:30 a.m.: The results: “While Gaudi 2 is implemented in the same 7nm process as the A100, it delivers twice the throughput for both ResNet50 and BERT models, the two most popular vision and language models.”

Thanks, Eitan!

10:30 a.m.: Sandra’s got llamas to brush — we’re back with Christoph.

Do you smell burning? I thought it was overcooked popcorn and then remembered where I am — it’s my fingers.

We’ve showcased some pretty incredible innovation, Christoph says, “but our work needs to go beyond just the technologies. How do you ensure the brightest future?”

Intel’s partners at Autodesk are helping “a group of geniuses” to answer that question, he says, and cues up an accompanying video.

10:31 a.m.The Hidden Genius Project set out to change underrepresentation in the tech industry, training and mentoring Black male youth in technology creation, entrepreneurship and leadership skills.

10:33 a.m.: Christoph invites Marcus Kennedy, who leads Intel’s gaming, creator and Esports segment, on stage to talk about preparing the future workforce.

Marcus: As co-chair of the Intel Black Leadership Council, I am thrilled to announce that Intel will be joining Autodesk and many other tech companies across the ecosystem in supporting The Hidden Genius Project.

Marcus Kennedy, general manager of Gaming, Creator and Esports Segment at Intel Corporation, speaks at Intel Vision 2022 on May 10 in Dallas. During the hybrid event, Intel’s leaders announced advancements across silicon, software and services, showcasing how Intel brings together technologies and the ecosystem to unlock business value for customers today and in the future. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

10:35 a.m.: Intel’s three-part commitment to the project includes:
 

  • Intel AI for Youth Express Training, a hands-on AI readiness program
  • Equipping the project with 20 12th Gen Core Monster Notebooks and 35 Intel NUC 11 Extreme gaming systems
  • Intel will hire two Hidden Geniuses each year in our “DRIVE” summer internship and professional rotation program.

10:37 a.m.: We encourage all of you watching to think about how you can join us in supporting the workforce of tomorrow, Christoph says. “Our world needs it and these kids deserve it.”

Thanks Marcus!

We’re nearing the end of today’s keynote, but there are “even more examples of the brilliant minds paving a bright future.”

Christoph invites Pat back but first calls up a video to introduce winners of the first annual AI Global Impact Festival, held last year in conjunction with the Intel Innovation event to democratize AI and celebrate AI Innovations.

10:39 a.m.: Here’s Pat: “It is my honor to welcome to the stage, Arnav, Max and Niharika!”

Arnav is from the U.S., Niharika from India and Max from Poland. “These future technologists are focused on making society better,” Pat says, standing with all three on stage for a chat.

10:40 a.m.: “Congratulations to each of you,” Pat says, “and I want to ask for your thoughts: what’s the biggest challenge for the future? And how would you like to use tech to solve that challenge?

Arnav: There are so many important issues, but in terms of scope, it’s eliminating the impact of disease. We’re at a point with AI that it will impact the development of medical technology. I envision continuous monitoring to prevent disease from starting.

Max: There’s so much beauty in the world, but it hasn’t been seen by some 300 million blind people. We can solve it, to change the darkness to light.

Niharika: Quality healthcare for everyone, everywhere. There are over a billion people in India, but affordable, quality healthcare is possible. AI-based programs can help.

10:45 a.m.: The orchestra almost started, so Pat sweeps everybody off stage and jogs back to center.

“The world runs on semiconductors,” Pat asserts. Intel’s got the skills in silicon, platform, software, architecture, design, manufacturing and scale to let you “focus on the opportunities and fuel the next-gen innovation your business specializes in.”

“There’s so much that’s simply not possible — yet.” We push on “at a torrid pace…to create world-changing technology that improves the life of every person on the planet.”

“Today’s renaissance will lead us into tomorrow. Together we can set a course for the new era. Thank you!”

And that’s a wrap! I’m hoping all those guests return on stage for an SNL-style closing jam, but in the meantime, you can find all the details on this morning’s news and through the rest of Intel Vision in the press kit. Thank you for following!

 

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