Intel International Science and Engineering Fair: Winners

Top Honors Awarded at Intel ISEF 2017

Following a week-long celebration of science at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF)1 in Los Angeles, California, Intel Corporation and Society for Science & the Public announced the top award winners for 2017.

Ivo Zell, 18, of Lorch, Germany, received top honors with the Gordon E. Moore Award and a USD 75,000 prize. Amber Yang, 18, of Winter Park, Florida, and Valerio Pagliarino, 17, of Castelnuovo Calcea, Italy, each received an Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award and a USD 50,000 scholarship.

In addition, more than 400 Intel ISEF competitors received scholarships and prizes for innovative research presented at the competition. This include 20 “Best of Category” winners, as well as grants to the winners’ schools and their Intel ISEF-affiliated fairs.

Intel ISEF awards included more than USD 4 million in scholarships and prizes. 

GORDON E. MOORE AWARD WINNER

Ivo Zell, 18, of Lorch, Germany, received the Gordon E. Moore Award of USD 75,000 for designing and building a remote-control prototype of a new “flying wing” aircraft. 

Zell’s prototype aircraft features an unusual bell-shaped lift profile for improved stability and the telemetry required to fly it.

While many flying wing aircraft are unstable in flight because they have little or no fuselage or tail, the modified shape of Zell’s aircraft allows it to operate smoothly and safely in challenging flight situations without significantly sacrificing its enhanced fuel efficiency.

INTEL FOUNDATION YOUNG SCIENTIST AWARD WINNERS

Runners-up honors went to two individuals named as Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award winners. Each of these students received USD 50,000 in scholarship funds for their ground-breaking research.

Amber Yang, 18, of Windermere, Florida, developed an innovative approach to predict the locations of space debris clouds that move in low Earth orbit.

An estimated 500,000 space trash objects now pose a potential hazard for spacecraft. Yang adapted an algorithm to train her own artificial neural network to recognize space objects in a specific debris cloud and predict their future locations.

Valerio Pagliarino, 17, of Castelnuovo Calcea, Italy, created a prototype of a novel laser-based, wireless, high-speed network.

Motivated by the lack of reliable Internet access in his rural locale, Pagliarino designed his new system using off-the-shelf components and then built and tested a small version of the network.

Product and Performance Information

1Intel International Science and Engineering Fair is a program of Society for Science & the Public.