Processors
Intel® Xeon® Processor
Boxed Intel®Xeon® Processor MP installation instructions

Updated March 2004

The following overview and installation instructions are for professional system integrators building servers that use Intel® Xeon® processors MP with industry-accepted motherboards, chassis, and peripherals. It contains technical information intended to aid in system integration. Boxed Intel Xeon processor MP product information can be found in the processor overview and related material.


The Boxed Intel® Xeon® Processor MP

Processor Overview
The Intel Xeon processor MP is based on the Intel® NetBurst™ microarchitecture. There are two families of processors available under the Intel Xeon processor MP brand name. The first family of processors is available with speeds from 1.40 GHz to 1.60 GHz and has 256 KB of L2 cache and either 512 KB or 1 MB L3 cache. This first family of Intel Xeon processor MP was built using the .18 micron process.

The second family of processors also available under the Intel Xeon processor MP brand name is available at speeds up to 3 GHz. This family of processors has a 512KB L2 cache and either 1 MB, 2 MB or 4MB of L3 cache. This processor is built using the .13 micron process.

Important! For future reference the first family of Intel Xeon processors MP will be referred to as Intel Xeon processors MP with up to 1 MB L3 cache based on the .18 micron process. The second family will be referred to as the Intel Xeon processors MP with up to 4 MB of L3 cache based on the .13 micron process.

It is important to be able to distinguish between these two families of processors because the different processor families utilize different hardware kits. See table below:

  Intel® Xeon® Processor MP with up to 2 MB of L3 Cache Based on the .13 Micron Process Intel® Xeon® Processor MP with up to 1 MB of L3 Cache Based on the .18 Micron Process
Product Description Second family MP processor with Intel NetBurst microarchitecture with larger L2 & L3 cache and enhanced performance First family of Intel Xeon processors MP with Intel NetBurst microarchitecture and integrated L3 cache
Frequency 1.50 GHz 1 MB L3 cache
1.90 GHz 1 MB L3 cache
2 GHz 1 MB L3 cache
2 GHz 2 MB L3 cache
2.20 GHz 2 MB L3 cache
2.50 GHz 1 MB L3 cache
2.70 GHz 2 MB L3 cache
2.80 GHz 2 MB L3 cache
3 GHz 4 MB L3 cache

1.40 GHz 512 KB L3 cache
1.50 GHz 512 KB L3 cache
1.60 GHz 1 MB L3 cache
L2 cache
L3 cache

512 KB
1MB, 2MB or 4MB

256 KB
512 KB or 1 MBe
Package INT3-mPGA INT3-mPGA
System Bus 400 MHz 400 MHz
Socket 603-pin socket 603-pin socket
Validated Chipset Serverworks* GH-HE Serverworks* GH-HE
Boxed Heatsink 36 Fin copper base aluminum fin without chamfered corners. Part number:
A93122-001
32 Fin copper aluminum hybrid with chamfered corners Part number: A87945-001
Validated Chipset Serverworks* GH-HE Serverworks* GH-HE
Retension Mechanism Part number: C16025-0011 Part number: A79880-001
RM Clips Part number: C16025-0011 Part number: A79880-001
Thermal Grease 500cc G751 dispenser part number: C16025-0011 450cc G749 dispenser. Part number: A79880-001
Highlighted text signifies changes between processor families

Included with the Boxed Intel® Xeon® Processor MP

  • Intel® Xeon® processor MP
  • Thermal interface material (in applicator)
  • Passive heatsink
  • Retention mechanism, clips, and screws
  • Installation instructions and Certificate of Authenticity
  • Intel® Inside logo label
Figure 1. Boxed Intel Xeon processor MP components
Figure 1. Boxed Intel Xeon Processor MP Components

Intel Xeon processor MP with up to 2 MB L3 cache based on the .13 micron process

  1. Passive processor heatsink
  2. Processor retention mechanism clips x2
  3. Thermal grease applicator
  4. Retention mechanism x2
  5. Retention mechanism screws x4

Intel Xeon processor MP with up to 1 MB L3 cache based on the .18 micron process

  1. Passive processor heatsink
  2. Processor retention mechanism clips x2
  3. Thermal grease applicator
  4. Retention mechanism x2
  5. Retention mechanism screws x4

Identifying a Boxed Processor
Boxed processor test specifications (or S-Specs) marked on the underside of the Intel Xeon processor MP identify specific information about the processor. Using the S-Spec Reference Table and the information marked on the processor, a system integrator can verify the appropriate speed rating, stepping, lot number, serial number and other important information about the processor. The numbers marked on the processor should match the numbers on the processor box label.

Once the boxed processor is installed into a system, the markings on the processor are not visible, and the processor will need to be removed in order to see the markings. In order to avoid this step, there is a removable sticker provided on the boxed processor shipping carton that can be removed and placed inside the chassis. If the processors are upgraded, the markings you've attached to the chassis should be replaced, removed or obviously marked as obsolete to avoid confusion.

Platform Requirements
System integrators building systems based on the boxed Intel Xeon processor MP should use chassis, power supplies, and system boards that are specifically designed for the Intel Xeon processor MP.

Selecting a System Board
The ServerWorks* GC-HE* chipset has been designed to support the Intel Xeon processor MP and provides the 4 way Symmetric Multi-Processing capabilities. The Intel Xeon processor MP is not designed to be compatible with either the I860 or the E7500 chipsets. Any attempt to use I860 or the E7500 chipsets with the Intel Xeon processor MP is considered a non supported configuration. System boards must meet the electrical and mechanical specifications of the Intel Xeon processor MP as documented in the EMTS, Thermal Design Guide and the product datasheet. Intel tests system boards for basic compatibility and documents passing boards on a reference list for the Boxed Intel Xeon processor MP. There will be a tested platform list posted once the testing has been completed.

Heatsink Support
The boxed processor includes an unattached passive heatsink. A chassis specifically designed to provide sufficient airflow to the Intel Xeon processor MP must used to ensure proper cooling.

Selecting a Chassis
Due to the nature of enterprise level backend servers, Intel Xeon processor MP-based systems are expected to provide a system kit including the chassis, motherboard and power supply. This is typically done to provide more sophisticated fail-over and system management capabilities.

Warning Failure to use a chassis that provides adequate cooling may void the processor warranty.

Integrating an Intel Xeon Processor MP-Based System
System boards supporting the boxed Intel Xeon processor MP include a manual with installation instructions. Consult this manual in addition to the boxed processor manual before building an Intel Xeon processor MP-based system. In addition, the following information can aid system integrators in successfully integrating a boxed Intel Xeon processor MP-based system.

System Board Installation
If necessary, mount the system board by following the instructions provided by the system board manufacture. Install two retention mechanisms per processor (provided with the boxed processor) to the system board and chassis using the long screws (provided with the boxed processor).

Figure 4. Installing the Retention Mechanisms
Figure 4. Installing the retention mechanisms

Processor Installation
Open the processor socket handle (see Figure 5) and align the processor using the pin one markings on the processor and socket for reference. The processor pin one marking on the interposer of the OOI package should be aligned with pin one mark on the socket. Markings on the integrated heat spreader should not be used for installation alignment. Insert the processor into the socket and close the socket handle.

CRITICAL STEP: Use the thermal interface material applicator provided with the boxed processor to apply all of the thermal interface material to the center of the processor's integrated heat spreader (see Figure 6). Center the fan heatsink over the socket and retention mechanism assembly and allow the heatsink base to compress the thermal interface material over the surface of the processor's integrated heat spreader. Next, install the two clips onto the heatsink and retention mechanisms. To do this, first attach the center tab on the retention mechanism and heatsink. Second, while holding one side of the clip down over the retention mechanism interface tab, push the other side of the clip down over the symmetric retention mechanism tab.

It may be necessary to use a flat head screwdriver to complete the clip installation. Once both clips are installed, verify that the heatsink is securely retained and that the clips are properly engaged with the retention mechanisms.

Figure 5. Open Socket Handle Figure 6. Install Processor and Close Socket Figure 7. Apply Thermal Greast
Figure 5. Open Socket Handle Figure 6. Install Processor and Close Socket Handle Figure 7. Apply Thermal Grease


Figure 8. Install Heatsink Figure 9. Attach Clips
Figure 8. Install Heatsink Figure 9. Attach Clips

System Memory Installation
Consult the system board manual for information about system memory installation. The correct placement for the system memory may vary by system board manufacture. Be sure that the memory is completely seated in the memory connectors.

Maintaining and Upgrading an Intel Xeon Processor MP-Based System

Processor Removal
Every time the heatsink is re-attached after being removed from the processor, it is critical that more thermal interface material be applied to the processor's integrated heat spreader in order to ensure proper thermal transfer to the boxed processor heatsink.

Note Heatsink attach clips apply force to the heatsink base to maintain desired pressure on the thermal interface material between the package and the heatsink, and help to hold the heatsink in place under dynamic loading. The clips may be susceptible to deformation during any rework or upgrade procedure where the heatsink assembly is disassembled. Intel's clip design was validated with unused clips that were not subjected to an assembly-disassembly cycle. The system integrator should exercise caution in re-using clips that have experienced one or more assembly-disassembly cycles.
Caution If you find that considerable force is required to remove the boxed processor assembly, consider wearing gloves to protect your hands and take care to keep your hands away from any metal edges on the chassis when removing components.

To remove the boxed processor from the system, first make the processor area accessible. Remove the two clips from the retention mechanisms. This may require the use of a flat head screwdriver to pry the clip away from the retention mechanism (be careful not to damage the motherboard, when using the screwdriver). Remove the heatsink from the processor and retention mechanisms. Slightly twisting the heatsink back and forth in the retention mechanisms and heating the sink may make the heatsink easier to remove by lessening the surface tension force of thermal interface material between the processor and heatsink. Once the heatsink is removed, lift the processor socket handle to release the processor pins from the socket and carefully lift the processor out of the socket (being careful not to bend any of the processor pins).

System Memory Upgrades
When upgrading system memory, it is preferable to match the memory speed and type of the memory installed in the system. For example, a system with PC1600 DDR memory should be complimented with more PC1600 DDR memory. Although certain combinations may be supported by the chipset (i.e. different memory speeds that default to the lower speed of the two installed), it is critical to verify system board support for any memory combination used (speed, type, size).

Software and Operating System Considerations
The Intel Xeon processor MP is a completely different microarchitecture from Intel's prior microprocessors that were based on the P6 microarchitecture. The Intel NetBurst microarchitecture supports the entire IA32 instruction set including Intel's MMX™ technology and the Streaming SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data) Extension. It also includes 144 more instructions called the Streaming SIMD Extensions 2 or SSE2. The SSE2 instructions compliment MMX technology and SSE instructions by supplying increased computation capability, support for larger data types (e.g. double-precision floating point numbers and 64-bit packed integer numbers), and several data handling and conversion instructions. In addition, the Intel NetBurst microarchitecture enhances the P6 microarchitecture's floating-point unit.

Operating System Support
Nearly all modern operating systems designed for the Intel Architecture have support for the Intel Xeon processor MP, although some may require specific versions or processor support files. Many Microsoft* operating systems like Windows* 98 SE, Windows NT* 4 with Service Pack 5, Windows* 2000, and Windows* ME, support the Intel Xeon processor MP. Linux* distributions based on the Linux* 2.4 core support the processor. Also, many other vendors have support for the Intel Xeon processor MP in their operating systems. System integrators should verify that the operating system they have selected supports the Intel Xeon processor MP.

All operating systems that support the SSE instructions that were first introduced with the Intel® Pentium III processor will also support the SSE2 instructions introduced with the Pentium 4 Processor and Intel Xeon processor MP. To experience the power of the SSE2 instructions, it is critical that system integrators install drivers and software that has been optimized for the Intel Xeon processor MP's SSE2 instructions. For example, for maximum system performance, system integrators using Microsoft operating systems that support DirectX* should load DirectX 8 or higher.

Software Optimization
With specific drivers that use the SSE2 instructions, graphics accelerators, audio hardware and software, and other system resources can experience substantial performance gain. It is critical that the system also uses APIs that use SSE2 instructions to achieve maximum performance. Two examples are Microsoft's DirectX 8 and higher and Open GL 1.2 and higher. Most major graphics accelerator vendors have optimized drivers that use the SSE2 instructions. Graphics card vendors typically highlight support changes with new driver releases. Download and install the latest drivers (dated later than October 2000) from the vendor's web site. Also, verify that the driver version contains optimization for the Pentium 4 Processor or Intel Xeon processor MP.

Many applications also use the SSE2 instructions to experience the breakthrough performance of the Intel Xeon processor MP. System integrators should contact software vendors to verify support and determine version information.

System performance is greatly affected by proper operating system and driver installation processes. For example, it is important to install the latest Intel® Chipset Software Installation Utility immediately after installing most Microsoft operating systems to ensure proper drivers for the chipset are installed prior to installation of other drivers. System integrators should confirm boxed -based systems are optimally configured and integrated.

Conclusion
Boxed Intel Xeon processor MP-based systems require proper integration. System integrators that follow the guidelines in this document will experience higher customer satisfaction by providing higher quality systems. This document has explained the following topics:

  • Processor Identification
  • Integration Procedures
  • Supported Chipsets
  • Software Support and Optimization

This applies to:

Intel® Xeon® Processor

Solution ID: CS-007758
Last Modified: 10-May-2013
Date Created: 15-Dec-2003
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