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Applying Privacy Principles in a Rapidly Changing World

Applying Privacy Principles in a Rapidly Changing World

As new technology and data uses challenge traditional privacy guidance, Intel recognizes the enduring value of this guidance and seeks ways to implement recognized privacy principles flexibly and effectively.

Executive Summary
Dramatic, fast-paced developments in digital technology present unprecedented challenges for companies applying privacy law, regulation, and commonly accepted principles. As a result, traditional notions of fair information practice principles (FIPPs) that form the basis of privacy guidance are under scrutiny. Intel believes businesses and policymakers should not discard these enduring principles, but instead consider new implementations that effectively protect privacy and encourage innovation.

The fair information practice principles that govern the protection of individual privacy were first defined in the 1970s—a time when computer systems, processes, and programs that enabled the accumulation, storage, and use of personal data proliferated. Over time, these principles have been adapted to accommodate the growing complexity and sophistication of new technologies and business models and the ease with which data moves across national boundaries.

Read the full Applying Privacy Principles in a Rapidly Changing World White Paper.

Applying Privacy Principles in a Rapidly Changing World

As new technology and data uses challenge traditional privacy guidance, Intel recognizes the enduring value of this guidance and seeks ways to implement recognized privacy principles flexibly and effectively.

Executive Summary
Dramatic, fast-paced developments in digital technology present unprecedented challenges for companies applying privacy law, regulation, and commonly accepted principles. As a result, traditional notions of fair information practice principles (FIPPs) that form the basis of privacy guidance are under scrutiny. Intel believes businesses and policymakers should not discard these enduring principles, but instead consider new implementations that effectively protect privacy and encourage innovation.

The fair information practice principles that govern the protection of individual privacy were first defined in the 1970s—a time when computer systems, processes, and programs that enabled the accumulation, storage, and use of personal data proliferated. Over time, these principles have been adapted to accommodate the growing complexity and sophistication of new technologies and business models and the ease with which data moves across national boundaries.

Read the full Applying Privacy Principles in a Rapidly Changing World White Paper.

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