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Collaboration Tackles Multi-Disciplinary Packaging Curricula

Working with Arizona State University to develop key microelectronics assembly and packaging technology knowledge

Microelectronics Assembly and Packaging Technology


Microelectronics assembly and packaging technology or "Packaging" is a key element to Intel manufacturing and product development. Much of the skill set needed to understand and excel with the latest packaging technology requires a multi-disciplinary background of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Material Science, Chemical Engineering and Industrial Engineering. Identifying the core elements of these disciplines, combining them into a base skill set and then fine tuning the specific skills required for actual packaging manufacturing can be a missing element in a university's technical curriculum.

Intel Corporation and Fulton School of Engineering, Arizona State University (ASU) have collaborated on this topic to identify the key skills sets and knowledge needed to cover a packaging curriculum addressing this multi-disciplinary concern. ASU has created the following suite of courses to cover these areas. The first year of this two year master’s level course focuses at leveling incoming skills to produce a standard skill set. The second year focuses on the specific packaging skill sets needed in the semiconductor industry.

The courses' topics, focused on the microelectronics assembly and packaging technology area, are appropriate for students and professionals from a wide range of engineering backgrounds. These courses address the microelectronics market's need for more detailed training in the assembly and packaging areas.

See the descriptions below for additional details on the specific courses.

Engineering Department

LEVELING course number

LEVELING Course Title/Description

Electrical

EEE498

Overview of Electrical Engineering for Non-EEs serves as a leveling course in introducing Electromagnetic Field Theory, Review of Circuit Theory, Transmission Line Theory, Electrical Network Theory, Review of Communications Theory, Electromagnetic Interference and Compatibility, Computational Techniques and Electromagnetic Software. Course Objective is for non-EE students to become familiar with fundamental electrical engineering concepts enabling their further study of advanced courses in electrical packaging.
 

Mechanical

MAE498

Overview course in Mechanical Engineering gives students in different engineering programs, a good foundation on the basic principles of mechanical engineering. This course will teach students mechanical engineering fundamentals needed for advanced electronic packaging courses. Students will be taught basics of statics and mechanics of materials. The bulk of the course will be devoted to introductory mechanics topics. Practical applications are included in different sections to give the student a glimpse of how the material being taught is used in the packaging industry. The course is meant to be accessible to engineering students and practicing engineers in any field, who have a good foundation in physics and mathematics.
 

Thermal

MAE598

Overview of Heat Transfer serves as the leveling course for heat transfer in electronics packaging, and also offers an introduction to various heat transfer mechanisms and analyses for engineering students who are not thermo fluid majors. Discusses fundamentals and applications of conductive, convective, radiative, phase-change, and combined-mode heat transfer. Emphasizes the modeling of thermal systems, including heat exchangers, and provides an introduction to the cooling of electronic equipment. 

Materials Science/ Chemical Engineering

MSE498

Overview of Materials Engineering for non-MatEs examines relationships among structure, phases and properties of materials processed under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The scope of this course includes metals, polymers, semiconductors, and ceramics. The student will be introduced to physical and mechanical properties and metrologies used to measure those properties. Course Outcomes: After completing this course the student will 1) Have a working knowledge of structure, phases and properties of materials processed under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions 2) Have a working knowledge of physical and mechanical properties and metrologies used to measure those properties 3) Build empirical, regression models from data to relate input and output variables 4) Plan, design, conduct, and analyze experiments efficiently and effectively for semiconductor processes 5) Assess process control and capability, and develop and use basic control charts for semiconductor processes 6) Computer software for hands-on analysis is fully integrated into the course and used for assignments and projects.

Industrial Engineering/ Statistics/ Manufacturing

IEE598

Introduction to Designed Experiments, Statistical Process Control, and Statistical Reasoning  is a course in design of experiments, statistical process control, and introductory statistical analysis that focuses on improvements to semiconductor processing and packaging. It is intended for engineers, managers, and physical/chemical scientists. Methods and examples are focused on semiconductor development and manufacturing. Computer software is integrated for hands-on analysis throughout the course. Methods presented can be directly applied in all phases of engineering work, including new product design and development, process development, and manufacturing process improvement. Course objectives: 1) Interpret data graphically and numerically, compute basic probabilities and use common probability distributions 2) Analysis methods to compare processes with hypothesis tests, confidence intervals, and ANOVA 3) Build empirical, regression models from data to relate input and output variables 4) Plan, design, conduct, and analyze experiments efficiently and effectively for semiconductor processes 5) Assess process control and capability and develop and use basic control charts for semiconductor processes 6) Computer software for hands-on analysis is fully integrated into the course and used for assignments and projects.

Phase 2 Courses - Advanced Topics

Engineering Department

ADVANCED course number

ADVANCED Course Title/Description

Electrical

EEE601

Advanced Package Analysis & Design: Electrical Considerations covers Electrical Functions of the Package, Overview of Power Delivery Issues, Signal Integrity Overview, EMI/EMC and ESD considerations. Course is intended to expose students to the key electrical design and analysis issues in microelectronic packaging.

Mechanical

MAE601

Advanced Package Analysis & Design: Mechanical Considerations exposes students to the mechanical aspects of electronic packaging. Stresses induced in an electronic package during assembly and operation, and the numerical and experimental stress analysis techniques used to study these stresses are covered in detail. The majority of the course content is derived from continuum mechanics and advanced mechanics of materials concepts, and illustrated with practical applications in the electronic packaging industry. Published literature will be used to highlight current analysis techniques in the industry. Some of the topics being covered include: solder joint creep and thermal fatigue, CTE mismatch induced stresses in multilayer composites, and a brief overview of vibration analysis used in the electronic packaging industry. Students will also be exposed to typical finite element analysis techniques used to study electronic packages, and the experimental validation techniques employed. The course is meant to be accessible to engineering students and practicing engineers in any field, who have a good foundation in basic mechanics of materials.

Thermal

MAE602

Advanced Thermal Packaging demonstrates the application of fundamental heat transfer principles to the solution of thermal cooling problems in electronics packaging. The course will consist of a series of lectures to introduce and develop the fundamental concepts of conduction, convection, radiation and two-phase heat transfer. Case studies will be used to allow students to work on application of these principles to real-life thermal packaging solutions. The course is meant to be accessible to graduate students in mechanical engineering, materials science, and to practicing engineers. 

Materials Science/ Chemical Engineering

MSE601

Advanced Packaging Analysis & Design: Material Considerations acquaints students with materials used for packaging integrated circuits (IC's). The scope of this course includes the purpose, formulation, and chemistry of materials used for IC packaging. The student will be introduced to metrologies and physics used to characterize material properties important for IC packaging. This course will cover the material property requirements for processing, device performance, and reliability performance. Finally, the course illustrates how the fundamental principles learned in class are used in materials selection and design. After completing this course the student will 1) Understand the purpose, formulation basics, chemistry, and key properties of packaging materials 2) Have a working knowledge of the use of advanced metrologies and fundamental physics to characterize material properties important for IC packaging 3) Be able to integrate processing requirements for packaging materials 4) Be able to apply these concepts to synthesize key material property requirements for a new packaging application 5) Be able to design and select materials based on those material property requirements.

Industrial Engineering/ Statistics/ Manufacturing

IEE599

Advanced Analysis Methods presents advanced methods and tools that are critical for the analysis of semiconductor and packaging design and manufacturing. It is intended for engineers, managers, and physical/chemical scientists. Methods and examples are focused on semiconductor development and manufacturing. Computer software is integrated for hands-on analysis throughout the course. Opportunities to use the principles taught in the course arise in all phases of engineering work, including new product design and development, process development, and manufacturing process improvement. Course Objectives: 1) Experimental designs for semiconductor and packaging development and manufacturing analysis. These include response surface designs, experiments for computer simulations and models, and robust designs that integrate noise factors. 2) Measurement capability analysis for measurement system development and characterization, components of variance analysis 3) Process characterization and capability analysis 4) Introduction to statistical tolerance analysis and simulation methods, applications of joint probability distributions 5) Additional topics based on class interest might include advanced methods for statistical process control, introduction to multivariate methods, advanced regression analysis, or data mining methods 6) Computer software for hands-on analysis is fully integrated into the course and used for assignments and projects. Background: An introductory course in statistical methods such as IEE 498 or the equivalent.