An image-level model is appropriate when you want full control over the image. A fully abstracted image can be centrally managed and then delivered to multiple devices or hosted in the data center. With an image-level approach, you can, for example, equip a contingent worker with everything necessary to complete his or her work, and then completely remove that image when the contract is over. can secure the customer data, move independently to another work desk, and access training without leaving the phones. Endpoint Considerations This delivery model requires an intelligent endpoint. Benefits Security: Application data is stored/ protected in the data center; local corruption is removed and patches updated at each boot-up; isolating applications limits data exposure. Manageability: Desktop image and data management are centralized for simpler administration, application management, validation and support, and more reliable backup; there are reduced image management and storage challenges if using public images instead of private images; licensing is centrally managed; adds, moves, and changes are simple. Performance: Local execution is virtually identical to locally installed applications; computing- and graphics-intensive performance is good; after boot-up, network demand drops to very low levels. Infrastructure cost: Fewer and less costly servers are needed; there are reduced storage requirements if using public images; streaming technology has the lowest initial deployment costs of centralized computing models. Disaster recovery and business continuity: Users can shift to a different site or client; client may continue to function if the server or network is down. Limitations Security: At runtime, data and applications are vulnerable to client-side attacks or theft. Performance: Boot speed can be affected by the distance from server, network load, and number of users. Cost and manageability: More storage capacity is needed if using private images. Software sequencing process: Not all software is suitable; initial sequencing setup/debugging can be time- and labor-intensive; streamed and virtualized application interactions can be problematic. Hardware/software image validation: IT must validate/tune streamed operating systems with each hardware configuration. Disaster recovery and business continuity: If using private images and the client loses function, manual configuration of a new device may be necessary. Mobility: There is no off-network or mobile use of a streamed operating system. ISV Products Citrix XenDesktop Operating System Image Streaming How It Works Client-based model. No operating system image is installed locally. The operating system is stored and managed in the data center. When the client powers up, a server streams the operating system image to the client over the network. The client uses its CPU and graphics for local execution. The client may be a PC without a hard drive, using main memory exclusively. Application data is stored in a data center. Best Suited For Environments where security is critical or no user information needs to persist after a session—in either case, no data is left on the PC after the power is turned off. Also very beneficial where local support may be a challenge or uptime is crucial. Examples: financial task workers like bank tellers, insurance agents, or others who work with secure customer data where mobility is not required; classroom settings, clinic patient rooms, and hospital rooms—a simple reboot gets a fresh operating system image and avoids costly downtime waiting for local support; call center workers who require training using video at their desks—they Calculating Infrastructure Requirements Before selecting a particular delivery model for desktop virtualization, you’ll want to calculate its infrastructure requirements and determine the level of investment it requires. Infrastructure components to account for include: Servers Storage 10 Intel IT Center Planning Guide | Desktop Virtualization
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